Monthly Archives: October 2010

SITUATIONISM AND THE GREEN PARTY by Robert Archambeau

As someone once said, it’s not easy being green, at least not in the United States.  Even here in Illinois, where the Green Party has had enough support to be an “established party,” theoretically on a par with the Republicans … Continue reading

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SATURDAY POETRY SERIES PRESENTS: GEORGIA KREIGER

By Georgia Kreiger: HE COMES For a time he lived between my legs where our urgent collisions seemed more than the common fuck, more like he wanted to break through the boundaries of skin and mind and dissolve himself in … Continue reading

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FRIDAY POETRY SERIES PRESENTS: BECCA KLAVER

DESCRIBING DESCRIPTION by BECCA KLAVER 1. Remember reading novels in sixth grade (say, Where the Red Fern Grows) and getting to the part where the author describes forest life or the look of the rickety old shed? And remember skipping … Continue reading

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William Eastlake: The Lyric of The Circle Heart Trilogy

   William Eastlake was a highly regarded American novelist in the 1950s and 1960s, but his reputation began to sink like a stone in the late 1970s and by the time of his death in 1997 he was a forgotten … Continue reading

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THE SPIRIT OF SARTRE

The Spirit of Sartre by Peter Gabel Taken as a whole, the work of Jean Paul Sartre is that of a sensitive man with a good heart gradually coming to understand the distinctly social aspect of human reality—that while we … Continue reading

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Andreas Economakis

DEATH UPSIDE DOWN by Andreas Economakis I’m sitting at my desk in my room upstairs.  The light from my desk lamp casts trembling shadows against the pale cream walls, just like in a monk’s cell.  In front of me, a … Continue reading

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The Coming Crisis of Global Food: Hunger, Crisis and the Canary in the Coalmine

By Liam Hysjulien In his seminal 1890 novel, Hunger, Knut Hamsun wrote, “I suffered no pain, my hunger had taken the edge off; instead I felt pleasantly empty, untouched by everything around me and happy to be unseen by all.” … Continue reading

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