SATURDAY POETRY SERIES PRESENTS: LAWRENCE CRONIN

MY FATHER WAS A WANDERING ARAMEAN
by Lawrence Cronin

Behold, I was somebody back there!
Then this guy, who calls Himself
‘I AM who I AM’, let me tell you, He
looks more like three hooligans, and
comes talking about blowing up
Sodom and Gomorrah
if “He” can’t find ten decent people.
Oy, they should be so lucky.

Back there they called me Sarai,
others called me Ishtar.
We had god-sex up in high places
on the pyramid of the moon.
None of this sordid swinging
what with slaves and pharaohs
and Abimelech!
Yech.

Behold, I was somebody back there!
High priestess of the moon
But now we have this I-AMbic god.
He, my husband insists we spell it He,
was over for dinner last night
with a couple of buddies.
I laughed them out of the tent.

I’m sure those three are thinking of
doing it again, but I’ve had enough
of this royal wife-swapping scene.
I’m getting too old for it anyway.
We’ll never settle down.
My husband should stick to sheep.

For behold, I was somebody back there,
But my father was a wandering Aramean
So was my husband, my brother
And they took me from those whom I loved,
More importantly
From those who loved me.


(“My Father Was a Wandering Aramean” was originally published in Perigee and is reprinted here today with permission from the poet.)


Lawrence Cronin: Ostensibly a practicing psychiatrist, Lawrence Cronin’s literary work is better described as that of a spiritual chiropractor working to achieve a better alignment of all our off-piste notions. Growing up in Detroit, Michigan, he dreamed of migrating out west. One day on the streets of San Francisco he met a Mexican girl from the town of old Tucson. Lawrence fathered all her children and is working on a series of novels based on the Book of Genesis.

Editor’s Note: Thanks to my mom, I am immensely interested in pre-monotheistic goddess worship, particularly that of the Jewish matriarchs. Today’s poem explores this idea, reflecting on a time when the goddess was turned away from in favor of the idea of one god. In today’s post, Cronin uses humor and wit to play around with these notions from the goddess’ perspective, a dance I know my mother will enjoy. This one’s for you mama; specially chosen for Mother’s Day. Love and light, and may the goddess(es) be with you!

Want to read more by and about Lawrence Cronin?
Lawrence’s work has appeared in the following publications:
– “My Muse” appeared in Sandcutters, 2008, Arizona State Poetry Society.
– “Alzheimer’s in Triptych” appeared in Harmony, A Humanities Magazine, University of Arizona, 2009.
– “My Father Was a Wandering Aramean” appeared in Perigee, an online literary journal.
– “Cutting Grass” appeared in Sandscript, Pima Community College, 2008.

Lawrence is currently working on a novel titled Edge Of Innocence (and its four sequels), in which Adam still walks the earth, Eden is a town in modern America, and God meanders into lives almost daily, shining new light on Biblical truth in surprising and shocking ways.

About Sivan Butler-Rotholz

Sivan is the Contributing Editor of the Saturday Poetry Series on As It Ought To Be and holds an MFA from Brooklyn College. She is a professor, writer, editor, comic artist, and attorney emerita. She is also the founder of Reviving Herstory. Sivan welcomes feedback, poetry submissions, and solicitations of her writing via email at sivan.sf [at] gmail [dot] com.
This entry was posted in Lawrence Cronin and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to SATURDAY POETRY SERIES PRESENTS: LAWRENCE CRONIN

  1. Maya Elashi says:

    Love it! Thank you. I’m particularly drawn to the term ‘IAMbic!’ god … An inspiring (peace) for today … now it’s into the fields of Mayflowers blasting bloom of red and silver’d-violet roses The Dead knew ‘mustta been!’ All Blessings.

  2. Lezlie says:

    “We had god-sex up in high places/ on the pyramid of the moon.” I think it’s time goddess-worship came back in style.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s