SATURDAY POETRY SERIES PRESENTS: THE BOOK OF RUTH AND NAOMI


1795-William-Blake-Naomi-entreating-Ruth-Orpah


from THE BOOK OF RUTH AND NAOMI
By Marge Piercy

At the season of first fruits, we recall
two travellers, co-conspirators, scavengers
making do with leftovers and mill ends,
whose friendship was stronger than fear,
stronger than hunger, who walked together,
the road of shards, hands joined.



Editor’s Note: Now is the time of Shavuot, a Jewish holiday with roots in ancient Canaanite mid-summer harvest celebrations. For Shavuot we read The Book of Ruth, a biblical tale rare in that it centers around the friendship of two women and reveres lovingkindness. Explore this story more deeply and discover a terrain that is natural, pastoral, and sexual, characters who push boundaries and subvert traditional gender roles, and two women who–in friendship–“walked together, / the road of shards, hands joined.”

Want to read more Ruth and Naomi poems?
“The Book of Ruth and Naomi” (full poem) – Jewish Heritage Online Magazine
Poems of Ruth – The Velveteen Rabbi
The Story of Ruth, in Three Poems by Erika Dreifus – Tablet


Today’s selection appears via Fair Use. Read “The Book of Ruth and Naomi” in its entirety via Jewish Heritage Online Magazine.

About Sivan Butler-Rotholz

Sivan is the Contributing Editor of the Saturday Poetry Series on As It Ought To Be and holds an MFA from Brooklyn College. She is a professor, writer, editor, comic artist, and attorney emerita. She is also the founder of Reviving Herstory. Sivan welcomes feedback, poetry submissions, and solicitations of her writing via email at sivan.sf [at] gmail [dot] com.
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One Response to SATURDAY POETRY SERIES PRESENTS: THE BOOK OF RUTH AND NAOMI

  1. Maya Elashi says:

    ‘~~~whose friendship was stronger than fear, stronger than hunger, who walked together, the road of shards, hands joined.’ This line. This line is what I love about poetry: its ability to paint the picture, beyond being analytic. Superb! Thank you, Sivan.

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